Quatuor Zaïde Quatuor Zaïde Quatuor Zaïde
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Quatuor Zaïde

Date of Event

Saturday, 25. 5. 2019 from 17.00
Expected end of the concert 18.10

Event place

CNB Hall

Price

400 CZK Sold out

Program

  • Joseph Haydn: String Quartet in G minor Op. 74 Hob. III:74
  • György Ligeti : Andante e Allegretto
  • Bohuslav Martinů: String Quartet No. 5 H 268

Interprets

  • Quatuor Zaïde

Concert partner

Cecopra a. s.
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Over the last few years the Zaïde Quartet from France have become a sensation on the music scene. Their 2012 victory in Vienna´s prestigious International Haydn Competition was followed up by a flood of invitations from prominent concert venues, including the Konzertaus and Musikverein halls in Vienna, Amsterdam´s Concertgebouw, London´s Barbican and Wigmore Hall, the Berlin Philharmonie and BOZAR in Brussels, among many others. “The Zaïde Quartet impresses by the level of each of its members, its homogeneity and sound scale,” wrote the French newspaper Les Echos.

Their repertoire is extensive, ranging from Classical music to contemporary works. They have so far produced three albums, their recording debut featuring an exclusively Czech programme of music by Janáček and Martinů, for the latter of whom they feel particularly strong affinity. “When working on his String Quartet No. 5, in 1938 and 1939, he was in Paris,” the quartet members note. “His personal life was then a bit chaotic, because of a love affair with his young student, the composer Vítězslava Kaprálová. Accordingly, the music of this quartet is embued with the atmosphere of a drama of passion, compounded with the impact of mounting political tensions of the time, and echoes of the musical rave which then engulfed Paris.” Bohuslav Martinů´s composition will round off the Zaïde Quartet´s Prague Spring debut appearance. They will open their concert with music by Haydn. “His work is our primal nurturing ground, so we like to begin our concerts with one of his quartets,” they explain. “His Opus 74 No. 3 holds a special relevance, as it was written in London, shortly after Mozart´s death. Their mutual affinity and admiration which were forged to friendship are strongly present in this music.” Respect and admiration for a fellow composer are equally audible in Ligeti´s Andante and Allegretto, which caps the first half of this concert. “It is an early work which betrays its composer´s admiration for Bartók. The melancholic, lyrical andante and the folk inspiration of the allegretto will be ideally suited to bring the concert´s first part to its close.”